• Welcome to the Association of Western Pulp and Paper Workers Union



     
    Organize Today

    If you work for an employer whose workers are not part of a union and you want to help to build a union in your workplace, fill out this questionnaire, and click the submit button.  We'll immediately put you in touch with a union organizer who can talk to you about unions and what it takes to organize.

    Call 1-800-542-0708

    or

    Click here!

    Organizing Resource

    Here you can educate yourself and members about organizing. This is the work center website with valuable information covering topics such as: how to form a union, what your rights are, and protection from retaliation. 

    Local Pages

    Legislature by State 

    For more information, follow this link to the Western Pulp and Paper Forest Products Safety & Health Conference 

     

    UnionActive Newswire
     
    Join the Newswire!
    Updated: Jul. 20 (10:04)

    National President Update - May & June
    AMFA
    PA FOP, STATE TROOPERS ASSOCIATION ENDORSE PA REPUBLICAN SLATE OF STATEWIDE CANDIDATES
    Pennsylvania State Lodge FOP
    AMFA-SCA Negotiations Update #14
    AMFA
    Teamsters Local 41 President - Joseph Monslow
    Teamsters Local 41
    2024 KC Labor Car & Motorcycle Show Event
    Teamsters Local 41
    Save the Date: 2024 Teamcare Family Health Fair Event
    Teamsters Local 41
     
         

    Subjects of Bargaining

    There are three categories of subjects that are established under the National Labor Relations Act.  They are:  mandatory; permissive or voluntary; and, illegal subjects.  

    MANDATORY SUBJECTS

    Mandatory subjects are those that directly impact – wages, hours or working conditions (or terms and conditions of employment).  These are subjects over which the parties must bargain if a proposal is made by either party.  This does not mean that the parties have to reach agreement on such proposals, but rather that they have to engage in the process of bargaining in good faith over the subject.  Mandatory subjects may be bargained to impasse.  It is also legal to strike (or to lock-out) to obtain a mandatory subject of bargaining.  

    Examples of mandatory subjects are:   

    Wages     Jury duty pay   Shift premiums   Bereavement pay    Overtime    On-call pay   Premium pay    Severance pay   Longevity    Pensions   Pay for training   Health insurance   Holidays    Leave of absence   Sick days    Tuition reimbursement    Hours of work    Seniority   Work schedules   Job duties   Grievance procedure   Probationary period   Workloads    Testing of employees   Vacancies    Rest and lunch periods   Promotions    Bargaining unit work   Transfers    Subcontracting   Layoff and recall   No strike clause   Discipline and discharge  Non-discrimination   Waiver/zipper clause   Dues check off   Mandatory meetings   Mileage and stipends   In-service trainings   Evaluation procedures   Parking    Health and safety   Bonuses    Clothing and tool allowance   Incentive pay    Management rights clauses   Equity pay adjustments  Dental and vision plans   Legal services    Work rules   Bulletin boards   Meals provided by the employer     

    PERMISSIVE OR VOLUNTARY SUBJECTS 

    Permissive, voluntary or non-mandatory subjects of bargaining are subjects not directly related to the work.  That is, these subjects fall outside of wages, hours and working conditions and generally are matters that relate to the nature and direction of the business/industry or relate to the internal union affairs.  The list can be infinitely long.  The parties may agree to bargain over these but are not required to by law and can refuse to discuss them without fear of an unfair labor practice charge.  They also cannot be bargained to impasse.  Furthermore, it would also be a violation to strike over a permissive subject.  Subjects that have a minimal impact on the employment relationship most likely are permissive, but it is not always clear.  There could be considerable gray areas in determining whether a proposal is mandatory or permissive and these might have to be litigated for resolution.  

     

    Examples of permissive/voluntary subjects are:  

    Negotiation ground rules  Recognition clause defining the bargaining Supervisor’s conditions of   unit  employment   Either party’s bargaining team make-up Interest arbitration   Make-up of the employer’s board of Settlement of a ULP charge   directors or trustees Pensions for retired members  Demanding that a Union settle arbitrable Use of the Union label/flag   grievances filed under the previous Internal Union matters   contract  (how stewards and  officers are elected,  Union dues, officer  structure, Union  by-laws, etc.)   




     

    ILLEGAL SUBJECTS 

    Illegal subjects are those that cannot be legally bargained over by either party.  They are subjects that would violate a law and cannot be entered into legally into a collective bargaining agreement even if both parties agree to do so.  

    Examples of illegal subjects are:  

    Closed shop provisions, discrimination, hot cargo clauses, Discrimination - language that prohibits an employer from dealing with any employees or against a group based on race, sex, employer, usually involved in a labor disability, age, veteran’s status, dispute, religion, sexual orientation, marital status, etc. 

    Thinking about retirement?

    Lacamas Financial Group

    532 NE 3rd Ave Suite 200

    Camas, WA 98607

    chris@lacamasfinancial.com

    Phone: (360) 834-6470

    Fax: (360) 834-4079

    Toll-Free: 1-877-463-3121

    Mon-Fri: 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

    The LPL Financial representative associated with this website may discuss and/or transact securities business only with
    residents of the following states: AK, AZ, CA, CO, FL, IA, ID, IL, MD, MI, MS, MT, ND, NE, NV, NY, OH, OK, OR, SC, TN, TX, UT, WA.

    << July 2024 >>
    S M T W T F S
    1 2 3 4 5 6
    7 8 9 10 11 12 13
    14 15 16 17 18 19 20
    21 22 23 24 25 26 27
    28 29 30 31
    Important Links
    Federal Mediation Via Video
    National Labor Relation Board - ULP E-filing
    Labor Notes
    The Stand
    DOL Office of Labor-Management Standards (OLMS)
    PPRC
    U.S. Department of Labor
    U.S. DOL by State Location
    National Academy of Arbitrators - Dispute Resolution in the Workplace
    Washington State Labor Council - News
    Oregon AFL-CIO
    Idaho AFL-CIO
    Utah AFL-CIO
    California AFL-CIO
    Virginia AFL-CIO
    United States Senate
    United States House of Representatives
    Tracker Exposes Export of American Jobs
    Climate video AWPPW
    Climate video AWPPW #2
    Paper Wars - An Industry on the verge of collapse - You Tube

    FROM: govexec.com

    Lawmakers propose a new federal office to regulate workplace surveillance tech

    March 20, 2024

    A pair of House Democrats have introduced legislation that would require employers to be more transparent about their use of surveillance technologies to monitor their workers.

    The bill, known as the Stop Spying Bosses Act, was introduced on March 15 by Reps. Chris Deluzio, D-Pa., and Suzanne Bonamici, D-Ore., and would “prohibit, or require disclosure of, the surveillance, monitoring and collection of certain worker data by employers.”

    Within government, the Department of Labor would also establish a “privacy and technology division” to regulate workplace surveillance technologies under the proposal.

    Sens. Bob Casey, D-Pa., Cory Booker, D-N.J., and Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii, previously introduced similar legislation in the Senate in February 2023. 

    The legislation “will increase transparency in the workplace and protect workers’ rights by preventing the abuse of workplace surveillance and requiring employers to disclose any surveillance they conduct,” Bonamici said in a statement.

    The proposals require employers who collect data on their workers or job applicants to disclose that information in a timely manner “that is conspicuous, freely accessible and readily available for viewing by any such covered individual of the employer (including on the internet in a manner that is freely accessible and machine readable).”

    Workplaces would also be prohibited from conducting some surveillance activities on their employees, such as performing “off-duty data collection” or any activities that could interfere with union organizing. 

    The legislation also creates new rules empowering workers when it comes to the use of artificial intelligence tools and automated systems to make employment decisions, such as restricting the collection of health information unrelated to job performance, data on their engagement with labor organizations and the monitoring of employee activities “related to reporting the employer or such a third party or service provider for a violation of any other law.”

    “It’s time to protect employees from the use of invasive surveillance technologies that allow bosses to track their workers minute by minute and move by move,” Deluzio said in a statement. “Workers deserve far better than a workday full of endless suspicion and surveillance; they should have a workplace with respect and dignity.”

    The legislation has been endorsed by several worker advocacy organizations and unions, including the Communications Workers of America and the AFL-CIO.

    Deluzio and Bonamici also teamed up to introduce legislation on March 12 to safeguard job applicants from AI-based hiring discrimination. That bill would similarly crack down on the growing use of automated decision-making systems in workplaces and would establish another new division at Labor, known as the “technology and worker protection division.”


    March 20, 2024

    Important sections

    Page 18 SEC. 3. DISCLOSURE OF CERTAIN WORKPLACE SURVEILLANCE.

    Page 22 SEC. 4. PROHIBITION OF CERTAIN WORKPLACE SURVEIL9 LANCE.

    Page 27 SEC. 5. ESTABLISHMENT OF PRIVACY AND TECHNOLOGY DIVISION. 

    Page 31 SEC. 6. REGULATIONS. 

    Page SEC. 7. WHISTLE BLOWER PROTECTIONS.

    Paused
    Supreme Court Will Decide on Legal Standard for 10(j) Injunctions

    When an employer commits a serious unfair labor practice (“ULP”), the General Counsel of the NLRB has the authority to petition a federal court for immediate injunctive relief—known as “10(j).

    Unemployment Insurance for Striking Workers

    Unemployment Insurance for Striking Workers (SB 5777/HB 1893) — Rather than negotiate a fair contract, some employers weaponize the economic instability of workers — especially low-income workers — to force a strike and “starve them out.

    Families condemn Koch brothers over ploy to avoid asbestos compensation

    Koch Industries bought Georgia-Pacific in 2005. The company faces over 60,000 asbestos lawsuits but has not paid out anything since 2017 when the company conducted a controversial maneuver known as the “Texas two-step”.

    WSLC April Sims 2024

    Sims on legislative agenda -  From easing environmental rule compliance costs to extending unemployment benefits to workers on strike, we’ve got an overview of the business and labor bills to watch this year.


<< July 2024 >>
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31
UnionActive Newswire
 
Join the Newswire!
Updated: Jul. 20 (10:04)

National President Update - May & June
AMFA
PA FOP, STATE TROOPERS ASSOCIATION ENDORSE PA REPUBLICAN SLATE OF STATEWIDE CANDIDATES
Pennsylvania State Lodge FOP
AMFA-SCA Negotiations Update #14
AMFA
Teamsters Local 41 President - Joseph Monslow
Teamsters Local 41
2024 KC Labor Car & Motorcycle Show Event
Teamsters Local 41
Save the Date: 2024 Teamcare Family Health Fair Event
Teamsters Local 41
 
     
-
  • AWPPW

    Copyright © 2024. All Rights Reserved.

    Powered By UnionActive


  • Top of Page image